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then anthony placido of the dea on u.s. drug enforcement and intelligence gathering. from the nation's capital, this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> over the last two years that has meant taking on powerful interests. powerful interests who have been dominating the agenda in washington for a very long time but they are not always happy with me. they talk about me like a dog. [applause] that is not in my prepared remarks -- but it is true. remarks -- but it is true. host: president obama kicking off the midterm elections with his remarks, prepared an otherwise yesterday in milwaukee, a state that he won in 2008 and where a number of key congressional races are shaping up. it is back to work today following the labor day weekend. the president is in washington. congress returns next week. some of the headlines this september 7. "the new york times" -- once a dynamo, they tech sector slow to hire. and tomorrow obama to push tax breaks for businesses. and the business s
for being with us on this friday. let's tell you what we're doing next. we will take you to the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c. and the panel session that looks at what we have learned nine years after the 9/11 attacks. there is an evolving terrorist threat and there will be several speakers. live coverage begins shortly. thank you for being with us on this friday morning and we will see to morning -- tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. on "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> we are leave at this national press club this morning where former 9/11 commission lee hamilton and tom cane will speak with reporters about how terrorist threats have changed since 9/11. the two are now co-chairs of the national security preparedness group of the bipartisan policy center. it's an organization founded three years ago by former senate majority leader tom daschle. bob dole, georg
will take a short break for lunch and at 1:30 p.m., we reconvened with panel 3 on the use of dispersants with three panelists. add to 30 5:00 p.m., panel four will focus on the future of onshore drilling, and we will have three panelists there. at 335 pm, panel 5 lil 0 -- focus on the response in the arctic. we will have five panelists. after a short break, we convene at 5:00 p.m. to begin the public comment period, and at 5:30 p.m., we will adjourn. any member of the public would like to submit a comment made do so via the web site at oilspillcommission.gov. we have a full agenda and we respect everyone's time. we asked all the panelists to please stay within the time limits in order to allow ample time for the commissioners to ask questions. there is a timekeeper right here in front who will monitor the time. we ask the panelists to please begin to summarize their remarks when they reach the timekeeper's one minute mark. i give control of the meeting to our cochairs, senator bob graham and the honorable william reilly. >> thank you. winston churchill described in event as not being the
'll be back at 7:00 eastern time, thank you for joining us. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >>. what's in 2007, analysts meredith whitney was the first to predict major losses for citigroup. she said -- our guest tonight on c-span's q&a. >> next, a discussion on the image of muslims in the u.s.. some of the topics are the controversy over the proposed islamic center near ground zero in york city. it is an hour and half. >> we welcome you to our briefing. and we have a distinguished panel year before you to talk about -- we call it a discussion. i want to be clear that this briefing is not about park 51. none of the panelists here are experts on the project or connected directly. this is not about park 51. the congressional muslim the staff association does not necessarily endorse the positions of the panelists here. we want to bring together experts and community leaders to talk about conversations in the wake of this controversy that is taking place all across america. it is a complex conversation that we're having right now. the muslim staff association represents a
the u.s. has blundrd into the scenario with one overreaction or another. bin laden needs to be the object of our hoss tilts, national security and contempt and deserves to be taken seriously. but most of what he has achieved we do ourselves. bin laden does not deserve that we even inadvertently fuffleful unimagined dreams. here's more from the president friday at this news conference. i think in this day and age there is always going to be the potential for an individual or a small group of individuals, if they are willing to die, to kill other people. some of them are going to be very well organized and some of them are going to be random. that threat is there and it's important, i think, for the american people to understand that and not to live in fear. it's just a reality of today's world that there are going to be threats out there. we have i think greatly improved our homeland security security since 9/11 occurred. you know, i am constantly impressed with the dedication that our teams apply to this problem. they are chasing down every threat, not just from al qaeda
he will embrace the notion and he his republic c >> the u.s. senate returned from their summer break. the nomination is scheduled at 5:30 p.m. eastern. the chamber returns to work and small-business lending bill that has been stalled since midsummer. follow the senate live on c-span 2. and the house returns from its summer recess tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern for legislative business. they will take up a handful of bills under suspension of the rules. those are scheduled for 6:00 p.m. eastern. tomorrow, members will take a resolution honoring the ninth anniversary of 9/11. on wednesday, they will work on a couple of measures designed to boost domestic manufacturing and a bill dealing with energy efficiency programs for rural areas. watch live house covered starting tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> with the house and senate back in session, followed congress using the cspan video library congressional chronicle. beginning cadets a complete -- you can index a complete list of congressional members. it is free any time. watch you what you want, when you want. >> the people who
that were donated to us. these were original patents that were provided. some of them date back to the early 1800's. is a reminder of what makes this country so great, our inventiveness. are originally there were a bunch of plates up there and i decided i have the whole plate room so i don't need another one year. >> do you have but george washington year? >> i kept george washington, i have a brown blanket. this was donated by steven spielberg to the -- i have abraham lincoln. this was donated by steven spielberg to a bill clinton. it is by norman rockwell. you have these guys cleaning the torch. it is a reminder that we constantly have to renew the flames of our democracy. >> when people come in this room, how do you notice them react? >> well, you know, somebody said this is the greatest home court advantage you have in this office. i think people feel a certain reverence for this space, because it symbolizes the presidency and it symbolizes what has been extraordinary record of tough tough decision -- of tough decisions and monumental decisions made in this room. usually people have a bi
, everyone, this tuesday morning. today on "washington journal," we want to get your thoughts on the right u.s. education system, the problems and solutions. president obama yesterday talking about the issue, saying we need to add one month to the school year, citing competitive nest for the united states. also, you have seen it on msnbc, and democratic candidates are talking about the issue as well. so it is your turn this morning to weigh in. what of the problems and solutions? all numbers are on your screen right there. we will get to your calls in just a minute. and remember, you can send us a or an e-mail. let me show you this headline. "new york daily news." let's add a month to the school year. year. the president backs and longer school year. then also the front page of the story, the president saying the d.c. public schools don't add up to private education. that is from the present yesterday as well. then there is a "the washington post" this morning with the headline. democratic candidates blast the gop over education policies, in search of a rallying issue. it looks like candidates
probably knows more about these issues than many of us combined. he will be joining us. >> the aclu and the drug policy alliance are advocating for federal legislative change. my coalition co-chair will be talking about litigation and state reforms. i am going to focus on the federal and legislative response, some of the history, and details about what i am talking about today. the aclu were some federal disenfranchisement from three angles. we litigate in court, will lobby in federal and state legislatures, and we engage in public education. as we face another important election, there are an estimated 5.3 million americans who will not be able to vote because of the result of criminal convictions. this is despite the fact that the supreme court repeatedly has said that voting is a fundamental right. most with criminal convictions are barred from the polls. 48 out of 50 states have laws that bar citizens with criminal convictions from bidding in some manner. two other states permanently in franchise criminals with felony convictions. there are 5.3 million americans who cannot vote.
that employee in the united states. therefore we have to go to warsaw or someplace else. high tech companies use this for engineers and scientists. resort areas use it for a variety of reasons. you will be shocked to know, some years ago, here in the state of vermont, apparently we do not have people who can be ski instructors. did you know that? we just don't have enough people in the state of vermont who know anything about skiing and can instruct. therefore, correct me if i'm wrong, we have to bring people from all over the world to be sky skee instructors. those programs, those guest worker programs are often exploited by employers. why do they do that? they can bring people from abroad, young students -- students and pay them less than they would american workers. we fought that. we're making a little bit of progress in saying, especially in the middle of an -- of a recession, for example, exxonmobil needed welders and they brought in welders from india to do welding in the united states because obviously we don't have anybody in america capable of welding. totally absurd. so what we need i
college graduates by 2020. we used to be number one. we are now no. 12. we are going to get back to no. 1 by the end of the decade. that is why we're revitalizing community colleges and reforming our education system based on what works, not is -- not on what is status quo. that is why we're fighting to make permanent our new tax credit. that will mean $10 million for tuition relief for each child going to -- $10,000 for tuition relief for each child going to college. we see an america where the middle class is the bleeding heart of the economy. that is why we passed health insurance reform to stop insurance companies from jacking up your premium, then drop coverage when you are sick or have a pre-existing condition. that is why we passed financial reform, to end taxpayer bailouts. to stop on wall street banks from taking advantage of the people. we want to compete on service, on good products and good prices. that is why we are trying to make it easier for workers to pay for retirement and fighting efforts by some parties for social security, because the phone if i am president, no one i
religion within america is part of an exclusive club. this exploitation of the truth that is used for political purposes since this is now an election year, and the fact is, most americans are the easiest targets. they are an easy punching bag. we do not have the reach. we do not have a lobby. we do not have a p r infrastructure. the other side obviously has the microphone. my mentor always said something that is very telling for us as muslims as well as for americans and people. the world is not divided into muslims, christians, and jews. the world is divided into stupid people and intelligent people. >> on that note, who wants to be the first u.s. question? [laughter] raise your hand and we will have the gentleman with the microphone, for. >> we've discussed this in the past. while we know that the great majority of muslims embrace and endorse the founding principles of the united states and want to be good americans, unfortunately there are people who do not. they profess to be acting in the name of islam. one of the difficulties it seems to me is that there's no central author
security. u.s. troops pulled out last summer. iraqi forces had moved into the lead with considerable skill and commitment to their fellow citizens. even as they continue to suffer terrorist attacks, security infancies have been near the lowest on record since the war began. iraqi forces had taken the fight to al qaeda. this year sell iraq called incredible elections i drew a strong turnout. a caretaker administration is in place. tonight i encourage the leaders to move forward with a sense of urgency in coming to form a government that is just representative and accountable to the iraqi people. there should be no doubt that the people will have a strong partner in the united states. going forward, and the transitional force of u.s. troops will remain in iraq with a different mission. they will support iraqi troops in targeted counter-terrorism missions and protecting our civilians. a consistent with our agreement with the government come on u.s. troops will leave by the end of next year as our military draws down, are dedicated civilians are moving into the lead to support iraq as a result
in the economy especially being maybe a poor stimulus. here is your chance toway in. host: you can join us off email at journal c-span.org. on twitter, go to c-span wj. we are taking your thought this is morning from the "new york times" business section. it says inside, the current is so appealing that many embrace them as an economic cure all. suggesting that tax cuts have limited ability to bolster a flagging economy. the non-partisan budget office analyze the affect of the policy and found that extending the tax cuts would reduce that employment. host: we'd like to hear from you tax cuts may be poor stimulus. a lot of discussions around tax cuts center around the cuts placed under george w. bush's administration that are set to expire in 2011. there's a large section at least giving advice on how to prepare. how is how tax rates would change. in 2011, if congress fails to act on this measure about the cuts expiring. the top income tax rate goes to 39.6%. top dividend tax rate goes to 39.6%. capital gains goes to 20% from 15%. no top estate tax rate now, that would rise to 55%. those are so
're on our twittergate. pat is joining us on the republican line from maryland. caller: i did not understand the agency that the recession was over. host: it is a group of economists. they said the recession ended in june of 2009. caller: obviously, they are not traveling around the country. if you will take a look at what is happening -- i go to hoses every day of people. in an insurance agent. i speak with people lost their jobs and their wives have lost their jobs as well. their children are dropping out of school. making $9 an hour to support their families. mr. obama is way off when it comes to understanding what's going on in the country. what is going on is more jobs are being lost. we just lost 12 of hundred more jobs at the steel plant in this city. 700 more jobs at the company that brings the food in for the two stadiums in baltimore city. another company just went bust. that was 1500 jobs. this is every single week for a new place is closing. you cannot tell me there is the recession over. the recession is going to last. i think it's gone to last another two years or three years.
. and anthony placido on the use of u.s. intelligence gathering. later religious leaders from the christian, muslim faith will talk about religious tolerance in the u.s. live coverage begins at 1:00 eastern. . >> is good to be in milwaukee. it is good to be here. i am almost home. [cheers and applause] i just hop on the '94 and i am home. [cheers and applause] its is good to be here on such a beautiful day. happy labor day, everybody. [cheers and applause] i want to say thank you to the milwaukee area labor council and all of my brothers and sisters in the afl-cio for inviting me to spend this day with you. [cheers and applause] this is a day that belongs to the working men and women of america. i want to acknowledge your president,g national presenc and a man who knows that a strong economy needs a strong labor movement. [cheers and applause] thank you to the president of the wisconsin afl-cio, the secretary of the treasure. [cheers and applause] happy birthday, sheila. [cheers and applause] i am proud to be here with our secretary of labor, a daughter of a union member, held the soleus, a
others to move with us. a little background. the threat. it is changing. since the end of the cold war, while the chances of an all-out global nuclear war have declined significantly, thank god, i think the chances of a nuclear strike have increased. during the cold war, the american, nato, and soviet military's were diligent and professional in the way we handle our nuclear-weapons. but we were also very lucky. we had several near misses, including but not limited to the cuban missile crisis. if we think that our luck will hold out with nine nuclear states and growing, plus the spread of technology to enrich the new clear -- and rich uranium, i think the world must think i knew. nine countries have nuclear weapons now. more are seeking them. terrorists are seeking nuclear weapons and nuclear. -- and i have no doubt that certain groups would use them if they had them. the know-how and capability to build a nuclear weapon is widely available, something we thought would only be the province of nations years ago. but it has changed. with the goal of nuclear power, and we will be talking a
talk shows he may be willing to negotiate a little bit on that. let us hear from jeff on the republican line in cape cod. good morning. welcome to the program. caller: i think he is just a shrewd politician. he knows he cannot act to stop the house from passing anything they want right now. a -- so i think he is just taking some wind out of the democrats sale. it would be the senate that would be the issue. but i actually don't think that tax cuts should be extended for really anyone. if the $3.70 trillion deficit projected and only $100 billion would be saved, that is still $3 trillion in debt. i am a middle-class person and i don't mind paying a little bit more for the long-term fiscal irresponsibility. i don't think that the tax cuts should be extended. and i do not think in two or three years they would ever raise taxes to offset the debt for expenses. i would rather see them expire and see what happens. tax cuts are in effect right now. the economy is in the ditch. i don't see that they will create a new job because they are not reading them. host: and you are a republican? caller:
. >> there was a column this week called, "a superpower super broke," talking about the u.s. it is estimated that there are about two hundred al-qaeda agents. >> how many? >> 200-300. >> i thought you said two hundred million-300 million. >> know, we are spending about $1 million apiece. this is the tip of the iceberg. this is a conceptual question. is there any thinking about approaches that are not so expensive that may be more affordable? >> let me turn your question a little bit on its head to say that this is actually the more affordable way of going in comparison to many of our other assistance programs, this is still not that large. compared to what we have to deal with in a country that is broken in the case of an iraq or en afghanistan, this is a very small amount. i would underscore, as the president and secretary have, that this is a matter for the international community. there are a lot of countries to have recognized this challenge and shown their commitment with their pocketbooks. it is a difficult time, obviously for us. you could argue that our british friends are on a very
. when i spoke with members of congress this morning, all of us are convinced of one thing. we have to display absolute determination, a total will that will not tell -- will not fail, and we should show absolutely no weakness in our resolution. the iranians had months and months to change their behavior. there was an extended hand by president obama. they did not grab that extended hand. these economic sanctions way as much as possible so as to bring iran to be more responsible. france's condensed -- france is convinced that nobody should display any kind of weakness. >> thank you. >> former republican vice- presidential nominee sarah palin will be in iowa tomorrow night for the annual ronald reagan dinner in the morning. we will have live coverage beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. the former alaska governor will be joined by iowa senator chuck grassley and former iowa governor terry branstad. book tv saturday night, bill clinton joins former british prime minister tony blair for a discussion of their years in office. that is on c-span-2. >> now a house hearing on a ch
us to the edge with wall street. i keep saying to voters that they need to keep pushing and keep the democrats in their. keep pushing, folks. host: you can join the conversation online, the twittered page is twitter.com/c- spanwj. or you can send us an e-mail and journal@c-span.org. we welcome our listeners that listen to was on radio. this is from the weekend edition of "the wall street journal." host: one final point from her -- "what is the mainstream media getting wrong in getting right? of the media does not appreciate how livid people are with washington." host: by the way, new polls are showing barbara boxer ahead in california. matt dillon says from arlington, texas, good morning, welcome to "washington journal." caller: thank you for taking my call. i just wanted to comment on how the movement that the tea party has, gosh, we are just tired all the losses and misplaced promises that the people always seem to give us. we had a grassroots movement for everyone. republicans, democrats, and tea party yeariers. this new financial reform bill has nothing to do with that, they
. whichever fuel or energy sources used, it will require infrastructure. it's very difficult to build out eight different types of infrastructure to meet that kind of broad technology platform. i think we will have some hard choices as a nation to make about what our future transportation fuels will be. that is part of what this study is hoping to shed a great deal of light on. again, as i've said before, there is no question that for many years to come, the internal combustion engine, fuelled by hydrocarbons, particularly crude oil, or going to be a dominant form of transportation here in the united states. >> should oil exploration be permitted in the great lakes? >> that is a great question. from a geologic standpoint, i don't know if the great lakes has exploration potential. in terms of whether or not people would want to explore there are not, i just don't know. as to whether it could be done safely and environmentally responsibly, absolutely. ours is an industry that operates in many hostile environments in terms of weather and climate and other things. i know the great lakes can h
establishes an act under section 2. the plaintiff will argue that the disenfranchisement law is used as a tool for racial discrimination. >> this rests on a finding that entire criminal justice system in the state of washington is intentionally against minority? what's that is not right. the evidence shows that the racial disparity arrives from and results in discrimination on account of race. >> there is no finding or no contention that there was any contention, even at the level of the justice system? >> that is right. >>the evidence shows that there are racial disparities in washington's criminal justice system. >> [unintelligible] >> that is right. they said the disparity is not sufficient. >> we would have to overrule that. >> you would not. the evidence in this case is different from that provided by salt river. the court was constrained by stipulations to the nonexistence of every factor that would lead the court to find racial discrimination here. the district court distinguished our evidence from salt river by finding that the disparities in this case derived from an result in discrim
europeans, they were well educated, emigrating to the u.s.. last year there were only three within the group by participated in. my colleague graduated in u.s., spending $200,000 of her own money on education. she went back to europe, and in these other countries that have no immigration -- no education and the immigration is a policy provided to the u.s.. guest: our population is multifaceted. our program shows that every time a child is given the chance, they can learn. in arkansas there was not much of a european population. all of those kids were achieving. the poverty level was 85%. we are proving again that kids can achieve, given the proper courses and teacher training. host: tom luce, thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you. host: go to our website, c- span.org, to find out the events we are covering today in washington. the president will give his back to school speech at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. a stakeout after meeting with caucus members with mitch mcconnell after the meeting on the small business bill. live coverage on c-span 2. thank you for watching.
in the white house. >> i think it depends on whether my cubs are playing. it is actually very useful because it can keep track of what is going on. well, politico of course. [laughter] and now google things all the time. but i have many -- most of the news organizations, have on there. i do have a few sports applications on there to keep track of that. one thing i have on their that was a bad mistake is pac-man. i was more time than i should, even in meetings as i am listening to people, doing that. i am breaking my personal records all the time. >> david axelrod, thank you for sitting down with us today. >> we continue our innovation in democracy program by bringing back mike allen from politico for next interview, with epilepsy, the former chairman of the republican national committee, among many positions. your brother. mike allen, thank you. [inaudible] >> i started out by parking cars. >> honest work. >> was in the basement and one of those typical. 18 years later, i was chairman on the top four calling people at home for money for the republican party. in those days, you wanted to make
admitted the deal before he was accused. we will get back to that, but where did you learn to be so -- use your own word if you want -- confrontational, hippie, in writing? -- pithy in writing? where did you learn that? >> you don't learn that. who you are. it comes from someplace that you do not really know, down there somewhere. >> people say that if you don't go to college, you cannot learn how to write. >> you probably cannot learn how to write if you don't read, but reading and college only have an occasional confluence, as you know. a lot of very good writers did not go to college, and a lot of very good american writers, such as mark twain, h.l. mencken, and we could go on. >> you are living where now? >> in maine. >> permanently there? >> yes. year round. >> what part of maine? >> i don't want to get too specific. a flyspeck on the ocean. >> where did you live most of your life? >> i don't know. i moved around a lot. i grew up in new york, and i fear i still have an affection for this city which i cannot explain or apologize for, but i have it. so i suppose new york. >> and you hav
this is a letter we got from maxim u.s. we're federal services. experts on appeals. medicare hired us to review this file and decide if the partd plan made the correct decision. we work for medicare. we do not work for part-d plan. we appealed and my wife won wholly. so the administrative law judge process. maxim u.s. has appealed that a decision and they say according to the term medically accepted indication includes only fda uses and those off dated uses supported by citation on one of the listed drugs. more over, medically accepted indication does not including treating physician testimony or proffer of medical efforts showing a drug as prescribed effectively treats the condition for which it's being used. converse easily could have included expert testimony as a source material for determining medically accepted uses if he wanted to do so. instead congress by reference to a drugs fda label and expert opinions in one of several drug. accordingly. medical accept the use is not the same as medically necessary. >> i would like to, we worked on issues like that so. we could be of help to you.
" reporter andrew zajac. and a discussion on the u.s. labor market with economist j. bradford delong. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] caller: caller: caller: caller: caller: host: general petraeus, secretary clayton -- glenn beck, among others, agreed that the dove out of reach center should not burn at the koran on the anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks. now we want your opinion whether you see it as a free-speech issue or not. you can see the numbers on the screen this morning. for the first 45 minutes we will be talking about this and going through the newspapers. you can also send us a tweak to -- tweet, tweet certification.com -- twitter.com/c-span-wj. here are a couple of articles about this. it has become headlines everywhere. u.s. embassies brace for karan burning protests. this is from the associated press. governor andate's u.s. embassies around the world preparing. from "the washington examiner" newspaper here in washington -- again, that is in "the washington
of the conversations over the weekend. for us, it was less about -- and i understand all of the noise about crisis and bailout and morale hazard. lehman had the capital. we needed the liquidity. we had four -- we went into that last weekwith over $40 billion of liquidity, we lost close to 30 in three days. we needed the liquidity. i really cannot answer you, sir, as to why the federal reserve and the treasury and the sec together chose to not only provide support for liquidity, but also not to have opened the window to lehman that sunday night as it did to all of our competitors. i must tell you when i first heard about the fact that the window was open for expanded collateral, a number of my finance and treasury team came into my offense -- office and said we're fine. we have the collateral. we can pledge it. we're fine. 45 minutes later, they came back and said, that window is not open to lehman brothers. >> yes, that is in the chronology. all right. mr. baxter, let me follow up on this. in addition to the -- did you see political considerations in the timeline? you see the debate about the fina
's primary results. zero be on your screen. joining us this morning from our news desk is steve peoples from "roll call." let us begin with the headline from the delaware newspaper, anti-establishment insurgency rocks of delaware. o'donnell in shocker. tea party-backed candidates funds. how would she be able to do it? guest: not surprised here. the tea party express came into town against the wishes of some people in washington. spent a lot of money. in a closed republican primary was able to make a difference and up said cassell. honestly hard to see this as anything but a nightmare scenario for the gop, at least in this delaware race. you heard karl rove right off the race and both people on both sides are doing the same thing. host: people did not think she could win this primary, either. guest: two different races. winning a closed republican primary which -- i looked at the numbers, about 60,000 people voted, about one-tenth of all registered voters in delaware. about one third of registered republicans. a very small sample. you get enough of your friends and the excited base out, you c
deserved for being a phenomenal leader and the u.s. congress for three decades, who's sitting right here in the front row. and i've just got to say how much all of it congressman phil crane has done for the cause. [applause] [alause] i've got to say one of the really early thrilled by head when i was enacted in politics as a young guy with cp had a guest there wasa young republican national convention in new orleans where i'm from and standing on a riverboat going down the river and congressman crane was there and was so approachable and he will remember it come up and i remember it to this day comes thathey're talking to me for the longest time, drinking a beer as if he had nothing better to do than talk to this college kid. and again, thank you, congressman crane. [applause] also one other shout out. my fellow yaf word member at georgetown university in the mid-80's and fellow fresan dorm for who we were in the same freshman dorm for, fellow iter, he is fed by a heck of a lot more people across this country than i did and is done great things to the conservative cause. my friend tried
guest has been david armor. thank you for being with us this morning. that is all for "washington journal" this morning. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 eastern to take your calls. have a good day. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . . çççç-our live coverageç ofe afternoon session will be here ççthe commission will hear frm people that deal with oil spills inçç alaska.% çtheçç session beginsçç at0 er(kspan. ççççççdavid axelrodçç jd ççpolitico in a decision onçe 2010 midterm elections. our look atçç privacy and communication policies by focusing onç the federalç laws that limit data collection. ç >> this was the second time that the court heard the case. earlier this year a two judge panel from the ninth circuit overturned laws because they were disproportionately affecting minorities. this is just over one hour. >> good afternoon. we are here they hear the argument [unintelligible] and we have judged gould appearing by video from seatt
permits. i'd now like to introduce our head table guests from your right. jeff, u.s. senate press gallery. jean from yahoo! news. lisa, "tribune newspaper's" "l.a. times." al, "the hill." andrew snyder, chairman of the speaker's committee, associate editor, kip linger washington editors. deborah, senior vice president, haguer sharp, and speaker's committee member who organized today's event. shawn, member of the press club board of governors. jonathan, bloomberg and former n.p.c. president. and a member from bergen records. [applause] today we are a little over a month away from elections that will likely bring changes in washington. poll after poll shows that voters are not happy. there's plenty of evidence that shows incurveents are unhappy. the economy is still struggling. the senate seems unable to move forward with major legislation as gridlock sets in final days before elections. it's not pretty. it's probably not a great time to be in charge of winning elections all over the country. or is it? our speakers today are two of the men who are in charge of leading their party's efforts
for bankruptcy. and like many of us, in that case, and certainly most of the people in bankruptcy, the porteous were shown to be horrible recordkeepers. and obvious a bad money managers. that's a fairly common trait, by the way, when people declare bankruptcy. they tend to have problems with records in money management. during these discussions, mr. lightfoot proposed the idea that the porteous' file their original bankruptcy petition under the pseudonym or various. let me repeat that. mr. lightfoot proposed that they filed under that name. he has presented testified to that effect. he said it was his idea to avoid embarrassment for the porteous', and for their children. because they didn't want it plastered all over the times they team. the newspaper in 2001 publish weekly names of everyone who sought bankruptcy protection and she was particularly embarrassed by that type of publicity for the family. while most bankrupt defilers enjoy anonymity through this process, and while so many cases, public figures were and are singled out other bankruptcy filings. as public figures yourself, i'm sure y
at the time of economic and fiscal arrested, and second is this the best use of limited dollars given the pressing needs to take cover ou care of our people. i share the secretary's objectives are reducing duplication overhead and access in the defense enterprise and instilling a culture of savings and restraint across the department of defense. on august 9, the sector followed up by announcing a series of specific cost-cutting measures, including a reduction in funding and for service support contracts by 10% per year for three years, a freeze on the number of o.s.d. defense agencies, a freeze on the general officers, a review and reduction of the number of reports, studies, and advisory boards, new limits on positions and contractors for intelligence functions. i agree with the secretary on the rapidly-expanding service contractors who supports the department. too often in the past we have constrained and number of department of defense employees without raisplacing a limit on service contractors. and rather than saving money, we have lost badly needed talent, expertise, and institu
give his perspective on the challenges facing u.s. cities and later, steve capt. talks about banking rules for the industry. from the nation's capital, this is "washington journal." host: good morning. it is friday, september 24, 2010 and you are watching "washington journal" and you can see it is a foggy morning here at the nation's capital. the senate yesterday, they managed to deliver a small business bill to the president. if they decided to delay the tax debate until after the election and on campaign finance, the republicans managed to turn down a movement that would have addressed the citizens united decision for the supreme court. we will be talking about a lot of issues this morning, including the house gop pledge to america. and there will be a discussion of disclosure laws for mortgages. we will begin with a discussion about the baby boom generation there is an article in the atlantic, can the baby boomers ?edeem their generation .. and our numbers are on the screen. we will get to your calls and questions in just a few minutes. let me show you the cover of the "at
country. thanks for joining us on "washington journal" and will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern half to take your calls. . >> happening right now on c-span 2, the impeachment trial of louisiana federal judge thomas porteus accused of taking bribes. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] senators are considering a judicial nomination before resuming debate on a small business bond. the bill includes $12 billion in tax breaks, an additional small business support for it live coverage when the senate comes in this afternoon at 2: 30 eastern. domestic manufacturing and energy efficiency, live coverage on cspan when the house gavels in tomorrow at 2:00 p.m. eastern. >> every weekend on cspan 3, experience american history. 48 hours of people and events telling the american story. here historic speeches by national leaders and eyewitness accounts by events that shaped our nations. visit museums, historical sites, and college campuses as professors and leading historians tell them to america's past. am
pensions were rewards of for a long work, and we used to regulate labor markets for companies. the retirement age, the existence of retirement age in our society is a function of decisions, both of increased productivity in the last century and decisions we made about allocating leisure. much of the leisure we chose to take from increased productivity went into shorter workweeks, went into longer vacations, earlier than in the last century, before say the 1950's. after the 1940's or so, much of the increased leisure went into what we call retirement, a time of non-work. we created this institution. it is malleable to some extent. it is also terribly important. the yearly retirement story is interesting. it begins to some extent with the unions very successfully negotiating 30-year and out early retirement options, and many of the unions that have defined benefits in many of the businesses agreed to early retirement provisions that served the purpose of on the one hand, rewarding workers for long-term service, and two, turning over the labor force. i say that because the flip s
in one million foreigners a year into our country legally. nobody can match us. nobody can come close in the entire world. the united states opens our doors to a million people to follow the rules and come into this country. yes, you can call it compassion, but it is random compassion. who said these people, determined by the white house, are more deserving of compassion than these people over here because we've got, according to most of the estimates, between 12 million and 20 million of these people in our country. so, why -- who decides and who picks those 17,000? and are we starting a policy that everybody that's awaiting a hearing in a immigration court will just be excused? is that the new policy? so 17,000 is just a start? i don't know, we don't have an answer to that. but the real question we have to be concerned about is, who made the executive branch so independent to operate that they can shut down things like drilling in the gulf and turn loose people who have pending court cases on their say-so? without any consultation or action by the legislative branch of the governmen
comfortable i think that will go a long way to helping us get out of what we are in. host: the twitter community on our website page which is c-span wj are talking about your background and the fact that you were a chief risk officer for several of these companies that were in trouble. guest: i was also a regulator. host: they are wondering -- and i am, too, you implied you didn't stay at some of them because of the risk the companies were taking. can you sort of speak in general about what kind of conversations you or some others that you know, your colleagues, might have had with executives and what kind of push-back you got? guest: that is a delicate situation for me because there is litigation going on so i can't speak to too many specifics. but i will come back and say i wrote a study on this back in the spring on risk management practices during the motor crisis and i believe the following from what i observed and it didn't matter what kind of institution it was, bank, thrift or whatever it was. or even the people there. these institutions, before the crisis, were very sales orie
a recommendation -- a decision by the president and whether that would be useful at the time. >> he has not traveled much. that is because he has a full- time job. >> do you think anything has been changed with what the people in afghanistan are asking? second, china's rise of the military in the indian ocean -- >> first of all, i think the elections took place despite the fact that the taliban are trying to disrupt them. there are lower levels of violence then there were during the presidential elections last year. at the end of the day, there was still a lot of effort put in by the taliban to intimidate voters. it undoubtedly had an impact on the turnout. a higher percentage of women in this election than in the presidential election. certainly there were a lot of complaints about the election that will have to be adjudicated, but i think having held the elections, the afghans were in the lead in terms of security for the elections. i think it is an important landmark that they have had these elections and that we can now move forward and tabulate the results of the election. >> milit
and a new york times wrote that grief is noble symptomatic. our sorrow's make us human. depressed individuals are unwilling to discuss their depression. they tend to conceal the depression. they do not admit that they are such a plea caution they are psychologically impaired. they put on a very happy face -- they are psychologically impaired. they put on a happy face. one statistic that i found to be an amazing statistic is that psychiatrists failed to diagnose 70% patients that have depressive symptoms. a 70% of the time, these are not recognized even by the people who have been trained to diagnose them. when it comes to primary care physicians, people who are not psychiatrists, 90% of the time, primary physicians do not see the problem that exists. this is an ongoing problem for the political system. also, in addition to diagnostic difficulties that pertain to depressive illnesses, the also pertain to social effective doses. one of the hardest aspects of diagnosing schizophrenia is that it looks like a maniac in its active phase and number two, certain forms of drug abuse, extre
with your tea party backed candidates? yes and no are the answers. republicans only. you can also e-mail us or send us a tweet. here is a -- "the washington times" this morning. that is the analysis in a "the washington times." from "roll call." also in "roll call" is an analysis. he says a lot of the candidates can be elected but delaware is different. it christina obama's victory effectively ends the party's chances of winning the senate seat long held by joe biden. that is his analysis. on the front page of "washington times" this morning is this story -- and "usa today" lead editorial -- that is how they see it. in "the new york post" -- the tea party gets wild. again, republicans only. we want to hear if you are happy with your tea party-backed candidates. mark -- mike from spartanburg, south carolina. you say no. go ahead. caller: good morning. those are the fringe folks and they are crazy. they can't win, thank god. but there is no plan for what they are going to do once they get there. they want to destroy education, get rid of social security. these folks are crazy. we can't afford
and anger, you are not behind anything that will be prosperous or positive. bringing us a better america where we are not fighting all the time. abraham lincoln even said this. we will falter with them, it will not be an outside force. just look in the mirror. host: all right. independent line, connecticut. caller: a quick comment, it is hard to tell where to party members stand on the issues. if you look at rand hall in kentucky, if you look at the way that they have been constructed and guided, not to speak critically on the issues, it is hard to tell where they stand conservatively. host: going back to "the wall street journal" this morning -- host: also in the papers this morning, an update on the alaska primary, "seeking a way out of the ft." -- out of the ft." -- defeat." host: long island, n.y., republican line. caller: i agree with the editorial. i am as fiscally conservative as you can get, but there is no point in republicans forming a circular firing squad. we need to vote for the people that can vote for the republicans who can win the election and make significant gains in c
fiercely for you and was very inspired by your message of hope. . . this is pretty remarkable. most of us, in fact, i am just looking around the room. i think it is fair to say that nobody remembers the economy of the great depression, so the worst economy that we have gone through, maybe one, maybe one, maybe a couple, but you guys look really good for your age. the 1981 recession, and this was worse than the three other recessions combined in terms of job loss and how it affected incomes, so that is going to have an effect on the entire generation. it means that they are worried about the future in a way that most of us were not worried. i think that this generation, the suns generation, they do not take things for granted. i think they think about the community and other people. they do not have a narrow focus. i am very impressed with it. their future will be fine, but in the short term, what i say to them is, first of all, we are doing everything we can to make sure they can get the best education. one of the things that we did this year is we were able to change the student loan pro
carbon emissions, let me tell you what will not work. it would not work to use cat and trade. cap and trade is being put out as the way to solve this problem. cap and trade is the notion that we will set a limit on how much carbon emissions there will be. we will deal out the cards to people who get to the met this much carbon, and then we will say what -- now somebody else wants to reduce carbon, you have to buy one of these emissions permits. at the same meeting where i met t.j. rodgers, i also met jeff in help from general electric. just in health -- jeff, after giving an impassioned speech about how greene general electric -- she might have thought they were green electric rather than general electorate -- how greene generally lesser was and how -- how greene general electric was and how deserving they were to get this, more efficient engines, and so on and so forth. he capped it quite well when i asked him a question, were they really that green or with a just lobbying? he got a little bit mad, and he said, if you are not at the table, you're on the menu. let that soak in for
this proposal for business tax credit. the numbers -- if you want to send us a message electronically, twitter is c- span-wj and you can also send us an e-mail and that address is journal c-span.org. and we will give you the telephone numbers again. we were having some technical problems. there they are. so, we want to get your thoughts on this. at the numbers, again -- our first call comes from columbus, ohio. gerry on our line for independents. caller: a beautiful day. the reason america tank in 1937 -- i am in my eighties, i am an old man. to have a realize, pump give water you have to prime the pump and you have to spend money and the u.s. chamber of commerce is not spending the money. they are working with the other party. it is just ridiculous. there is no reason why this should not be done. and i wish you guys would get on the fact that where is the money going to come from to spend a $10 trillion that the american society of civil engineers estimates it would take over the next five years to bring the infrastructure up to be-. still waiting for c-span to cover that. where do all these
to you about well this weekend, i have to go back to mississippi for a family reunion. >> give us a brief idea of what the book is about? >> the book is about the defection of 6 million african-americans from the south to the north, mid-west to the west. from 1915-1970 when the south began truly to change. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this as i went in. i'll read it to you. everyday more migrants are coming no the cities to seek a better life for their children. >> i wrote this book thinking of any country. it's a movie about the last train home where they have 150 million migrant that's live in the city each year. i want to talk to you about what you have written in the front of your book by richard wright. >> who was he and why did you pick him? >> richard wright was one of the greatest novelists of the 20 j century. he was a migrant from mississippi to chicago. he was the son of a share cropper and always wanted to write. i set out in 1927 to get to chicago. he spent almost his entire career. almost everything he wrote had to do with understanding the migrant exper
experience in washington. it was a national outpouring of people. >> just give us a brief synopsis of what the book is about. >> the book is about the migration experiences of three people that have become part of the larger whole, which was the defection of 6 million african americans from the south to the north, to the midwest and west from 1915, world war i until 1970. >> i went to a movie last weekend. they handed me this. i want to read it to you. every day, more migrants are coming into the cities to seek a better life for their children. the scale of this massive migration from the poor countryside to the burgeoning cities is unprecedented in human history. the migrants provide a cheap source of labor booming cities and the thriving economy is built on the backs of those citizens. do you have any idea what country that is? >> i am thinking the united states. i wrote this book with the idea that it would refer to almost every immigrant that crossed the atlantic or the pacific ocean in order to come here. >> it is the movie called "the last train home." they had 130 million migrants t
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